2-year extensions of development orders and building permits – File before December 31, 2014 in order to receive a 2-year extension of your development orders and permits in most Florida jurisdictions


2-year extensions of development orders and building permits – File before December 31, 2014 in order to receive a 2-year extension of your development orders and permits in most Florida jurisdictions

Bilzin Sumberg’s Government Relations & Land Development Group is keeping its finger on the pulse of recent legislation that may affect you. If you have a current permit or development order which is scheduled to expire between January 1, 2014 and January 1, 2016, you may be affected by the following update.

House Bill 7023 was passed by both houses at the end of session, which contains a provision that may affect the developer community. Section 46 includes a two-year extension of development orders and building permits issued by local governments. The two-year extension also applies to certain permits issued by the Department of Environmental Protection or by water management districts. Importantly, this provision potentially reaches back to expired permits or approvals and applies to permits or development orders, including buildout dates, set to expire between January 1, 2014 and January 1, 2016.

Holders of permits or other authorizations must submit written notification to the authorizing agency by December 31, 2014, identifying the specific authorization to be extended and the anticipated timeframe for acting on the authorized development order or permit.

Extensions granted under this section, as well as Chapter 2009-96, 2010-147, 2011-139, and 2012-205 may not exceed 4 years in total. Specific development of regional impact development order extensions granted pursuant to Section 380.06(19)(c)2, Florida Statutes, are not eligible to be further extended under this bill.

 

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2 Responses

  1. Keiichi81 says:

    How did you get that from the article? Basically, if your pitch catches Sony&1quo;s eye, they help you out by loaning you a free devkit and can offset your development costs with funding from their Pub Fund, which you pay back later out of the profits from your game. They aren&1quo;t taking on the role of publisher. You&1quo;re still self-publishing your game, just with a little financial help from Sony because you&1quo;re the cream of the crop. If your pitch DOESN&1quo;T catch Sony&1quo;s eye, then you don&1quo;t receive the aforementioned help, but you don&1quo;t need to pu1ue a third-party publisher to get your game on PSN. You can still self-publish, you&1quo;re just respo1ible for footing the bills you1elf without aid from Sony.nCurrently, the criteria for “catching Sony&1quo;s eye” seems to be fairly lax, as the article itself states that not a single indie dev so far has had to pay for a devkit.

  2. jeffhesser says:

    I appreciate you guys taking the time to get the story from both sides. All the chatter up till now has felt like mud slinging.

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